Writeup! Judged Fall Fine Art – 2022

The Fall Judged Fine Art show is on the walls at Rainbow Stew in Yucca Valley until November 16, 2022.

Our seasonal fine art shows are open to the public and judged by an invited artist or teacher and they provide a fantastic glimpse of what our local creators have been focused on. Painted & drawn works, mixed media, assemblage, stained-glass, and more - you can expect to see these types of creations during our Fine Art exhibits.

A total of twenty-three (23) entries were received from seven (7) artists! Typically, we experience smaller judged fine art shows, likely due to the fact that creations of paint or assemblage take time to fully complete. Many artists work on a limited number of art creations per year.

The 23 entries were sorted into the three judged categories of "Nature's Kaleidoscope", "Beautiful Creatures", and "Flowers".

Judge

Glenn Grishkoff was kind enough to venture out to this desert wonderland to judge this year's Fall Fine Art show. This marks the second time Glenn has been a judge for Chaparral Artists and it was a real treat speaking with him about art!

Glenn Grishkoff has taught, performed and exhibited his work nationally and internationally in Japan, South Africa and Thailand. He was awarded special invitations from the Shigaraki Cultural Ceramic Park in Japan and from Chiang Dao Artist Residency in Thailand where he collaborated with hill tribe people and the famous "painting elephants". He has lectured at The Mashiko Museum of Art and The International Workshop Ceramic Art in Tokoname, Japan. The Oregon School of Art and Craft, The LH Project and the Florida Keys Community College have welcomed him as a visiting artist and lecturer. In 2008, Grishkoff was awarded the Idaho Commission on the Arts fellowship grant for his sculptural work. Grishkoff holds a MFA from the Claremont Graduate University and a BFA from California State Fullerton. He currently maintains a studio practice in Anaheim and Los Angeles and teaches workshops in performance, brush making and ceramics. He is currently  a professor at Loyola MaryMount University in Los Angeles  teaching upper division courses in Art and Ecology.

Artist Statement 

California-based artist, Glenn Grishkoff, grew up watching his Russian father–born and raised in China–grind his own ink, calligraphically working with iconic glyphs onto rice paper. This childhood memory and his own experience in Asia taught Grishkoff the power of a brushstroke and the spirit of natural materials. The sculptural objects and performances he creates with clay, paper, wood, metal, glass, textiles and hair, reference his own story, the power of mark-making and the materials he uses. 

Grishkoff believes that paying homage to the animal spirit within the physical world is an important part of human experience. The artist is also inspired by the sculptural qualities and possibilities of clay combined with other materials. Some of these material explorations result in objects that are used in performance. Grishkoff uses objects to establish a sensual connection between body and mind that ritualizes the performance space. Grishkoff often uses brushstrokes to represent breath, along with masks, garments, and sound. Together, these elements draw audiences into meditation and offer a spiritual experience. 

Juror's Statement 

When jurying an artist show I go beyond my own personal likes and dislikes acting in the moment and with my intuition. I rely on my background as a professional educator, artist and spiritual practitioner. We are judged the day we are born into this world and until the day we die. In an odd way we become accustomed to being judged by others in our daily lives but when we are judged on the quality of our creativity, and how it fits or doesn’t fit into society’s norms,  this critique can become difficult to handle at times. Through my teachings I strive to free others from their fear of art to embrace  the act of creativity as an essential component of daily life.  

Some thoughts I often ask my students & artists friends to ponder & discuss when creating works of art:

  1. Are we born with talent or is it developed over time to be an accomplished artist? How does time play a role in making a work of art?
  2. For who and why do we make our artwork for? How can we stay true to ourselves?
  3. How does the creative process feed our soul and mesh into our daily life and the lives of others?
  4. Why are artist communities essential for healthy societies and cultures?

It was a pleasure being a juror for the Chaparral Artists group and I wish everybody  the best in their creative endeavors and continued success.

Sincerely, 

Glenn Grishkoff

Beautiful Creatures

First-place
"Mystic Raven"
Jennifer Grandi

"I love the way you captured the inquisitive look of this mystic raven! Beautiful use of color."

Second-place
"Cheeky"
Raini Armstrong

"Very playful and cheeky indeed! Can practically hear the water splashing.."

Third-place
"Gaia Moving"
Victoria Sebanz

"Inventive, very creative and exellent use of highlights throughout the leaves and body."

Nature's Kaleidoscope

First-place
"Midnight Jugglers"
Raini Armstrong

"Beautiful! Nice sense of movement in the ocotillo and nicely captured dreamy sunset. Makes me feel like I'm camping."

Second-place
"Roped Beauty"
Raini Armstrong

"Really like the abstract sky juxtaposed with the realistic trees! Haunting."

Third-place
"Rock Study #2"
Raini Armstrong

"Playful clouds and lovely textures on the rocks, looks like a breath of fresh air."

Honorable Mention
"Joshua Tree Park"
Nancy Miehle

"I really love that this is a medium that you don't always see in a fine art setting - really well done, supper interesting use of atmopheric perspective!"

Abstract

First-place
"Lady of the Glen"
Nancy Kimes

"Stunning colors and haunting spectre of the lady. Love it."

Second-place
"Green Aurora"
Eddie Tucker

"Nice flow and composition, playful colors, reminds me of the microscope imagery and macro imagery all at once."

Third-place
"Rapid Flow"
Nancy Kimes

"I love the flow - it looks like a topographic map and a lava flow all at the same time."

Best of Show

"Midnight Jugglers"
Raini Armstrong

""

President's Award

"Red Hot Sunset"
Raini Armstrong

Thanks go to the participating artists that shared their work with us. To Rainbow Stew and all visitors that make these shows possible. And congratulations to the creators that placed!

If you find yourself out and about, make sure to stop by Rainbow Stew (please follow any guidelines that they may require) and enjoy the Judged Fine Art show. It will be displayed until May when we transition into the open Judged Spring Photography Show!

We all want to take advantage of this great space because it sees a constant stream of traffic throughout the week. Chaparral Artists see sales through this venue, so do not pass up the opportunity to hang your art with us when you can during these shows.

Stay safe and continue creating!

Writeup! General Meeting – May 2022

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Date: May 15, 2022
Author: Raini Armstrong

Chaparral Artists had a great general meeting in May!

Our meeting officially started at 1:05pm and concluded at 2:30pm on May 9, 2022. Participation was up to 17 members and our guest demonstrator was Jennifer Grandi. Intake for the upcoming Judged Photography show was announced. The featured artist venues have Nancy Kimes displaying art at the Desert Hills Presbyterian Church and Raini Armstrong displaying art at the Center for Healthy Generations. Belated mother's day cheer was shared.

Dan Hivner, a new member to Chaparral Artists, was introduced briefly by Nancy Kimes. Dan is an artist experimenting experimenting with mediums, most recently the acrylic medium. We look forward to learning more about Dan and seeing his creations!

Nancy Kimes shared a brief story about how positivity is key to creation and success, by offering an anecdotal account of her drive to the meeting. She had two hours to travel the typically 2.5 hour drive. Nancy respects the power of mantras, in the positive aspects of them, and she simply began the drive and repeated a mantra that helps her in staying focused and open to good things. Her average 2.5 hour drive went smoothly, even when faced with literal obstacles in the road in the form of massive truck-tire tread scattered across the freeway, and veering vehicles avoiding them. Nancy made the drive in time for the meeting and happily shared her feelings on how positive thought can make a difference in so many tasks! She added that sharing your art with the public can feel scary, so many obstacles existing that halt us from sharing, and sometimes even creating. Remember that your artistic voice is important, and sharing it with the public both invigorates and expands your power to create.

Joan Scott shared that 24 of her art creations are on display at the California Welcome Center in Yucca Valley and will be available for purchase through June.

Officers and attendees discussed a possible date for a summer photographic outing and came up with two possibilities - Tuesday, September 13 or Wednesday, September 14. The plan is to visit Keys Ranch for a Night Shoot. The criteria was based on an early rise of the galactic center (Milky Way) and a later rise of the moon. It was helpful to have the outing planned directly after the September general meeting so that reminders of the outing would be offered in person and digitally. The Vice President will make arrangements with the Desert Institute to determine which date works best.

Eddie Tucker reminded participants of the upcoming Morongo Basin Open Studio Art Tours occuring on the last three weekends in October. The signup deadline is fast approaching - May 31, 2022. Artists interested in participating MUST provide all representative photos, biography/artists statement and entrance fees during registration. There is no saving the application.

A Marketing resource available to regional artists includes the Palm Springs Art Directory, an art museum mailing list that goes out to the valley and beyond. Raini promised to register with the art directory and provide a writeup to be included on the next newsletter or at the very least, the Chaparral website.

Victoria Sebanz is looking for venues that will display outdoor art. She is in the process of working on a larger art installation with doors, interactive it its ability to stand upright, provide a feeling of opportunities offered and decisions to be made... Suggestions included the Joshua Tree Art Gallery for smaller outdoor installations and the Joshua Tree Dry Lake Bed - a location that might be able to accommodate larger art installations.

Kathy Miller received the door prize of a Chaparral tote bag.

Discussion with Jennifer Grandi

Jennifer Grandi was our guest artist sharing a special introduction to a mixed media art form that she has truly enjoyed. By using acrylic paint and discarded palm wood.

Jennifer shared that she was always drawn to the large palm wood, their shapes and textures intriguing, and so she collected them when she could. After storing the collected material she began experimenting with it, learning that the slick surface didn't work well with all mediums. Eventually she experimented with acrylic, and after some trial and error, found a happy result.

Preparation is key to using such a natural 'canvas'. Jennifer applies a base medium to aid in acrylic adherence. She also experimented with usable backings to properly hang the resulting art pieces. Jennifer shared that over time the edges to palm wood frays, giving the piece a set lifetime, unless a substance is painted on the back.

Jennifer also shared her artistic decisions with choosing the right 'canvas' for the subject she wishes to paint. Often the palm wood texture and shape reminds her of something from her travels or from the creatures she enjoys in the desert. She has combined multiple palm wood together for larger creations and used single pieces for smaller works.

The artistic style she has developed supplements but does not replace her medium of choice - pastel - but it has provided wonderful opportunities for creation.

Writeup! Judged Spring Fine Art – 2022

The Spring Judged Fine Art show is on the walls at Rainbow Stew in Yucca Valley until May 11, 2022.

Our seasonal fine art shows are open to the public and judged by an invited artist or teacher and they provide a fantastic glimpse of what our local creators have been focused on. Painted & drawn works, mixed media, assemblage, stained-glass, and more - you can expect to see these types of creations during our Fine Art exhibits.

A total of twenty-five (25) entries were received from eleven (11) artists! Typically, we experience smaller judged fine art shows, likely due to the fact that creations of paint or assemblage take time to fully complete. Many artists work on a limited number of art presentations per year. And yet, these twenty-six entries were such a treat to enjoy during installation as they will be for a month during this active springtime in our desert!

The 25 entries were sorted into the three judged categories of "Nature's Kaleidoscope", "Beautiful Creatures", and "Abstract".

Judge

Jessica Graybill is a Mojave Desert dweller whose work is certainly influenced by both the desert and the tropical locations she has come to know. The fusion of such inspirations can only mean great things as her work indicates with its organic beauty with pops of vivid color.

The Mojave Desert has long energized and influenced her creativity. Her work is inspired by the natural beauty of her surroundings, with an emphasis on organic shapes and vibrant earth tones as she works in ceramic, crystal, and dyes.

Artist Statement 

Or: How I Learned to Quit Worrying and Love the Process

My work is built by hand from the ground up. I choose not to use a potter’s wheel because I love the meditative act of handbuilding and the organic shapes produced as a result of impressionable clay retaining the individuality of the hands that shaped it. Pinch pots, coils and slabs are the building blocks of ceramics, and there is so much natural beauty in these elements of form.

I am especially enamored with pottery because of its supreme versatility. Malleable raw clay becomes a durable final product, and the potential exists to create anything from a purely ornamental sculpture to a practical bowl - both of which are artful in their own right. Pottery is of the earth and to it, shall return. Once it outlives its functional life, the broken pieces won’t wind up in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch - if it makes its way to the ocean at all, it will sink to the bottom, creating a home for a hermit crab, a nest for an octopus, or a substrate for future coral reefs.

My goal is to create functional art with longevity. Art can adorn your walls, but it can also be infused into every facet of your life. Surrounding yourself with objects made mindfully brings an additional layer of awareness to your everyday activities. With monolithic corporations pumping out soulless, expendable (and often, plastic) objects left and right, it’s become a vital act of resistance to live a low impact lifestyle by shopping small and supporting local businesses and individual craftspeople.

Beautiful Creatures

First-place
"Mystic Raven"
Jennifer Grandi

"I love the way you captured the inquisitive look of this mystic raven! Beautiful use of color."

Second-place
"Cheeky"
Raini Armstrong

"Very playful and cheeky indeed! Can practically hear the water splashing.."

Third-place
"Gaia Moving"
Victoria Sebanz

"Inventive, very creative and exellent use of highlights throughout the leaves and body."

Nature's Kaleidoscope

First-place
"Desert Dream"
Joyce Nichols

"Beautiful! Nice sense of movement in the ocotillo and nicely captured dreamy sunset. Makes me feel like I'm camping."

Second-place
"Roped Beauty"
Raini Armstrong

"Really like the abstract sky juxtaposed with the realistic trees! Haunting."

Third-place
"Rock Study #2"
Raini Armstrong

"Playful clouds and lovely textures on the rocks, looks like a breath of fresh air."

Honorable Mention
"Joshua Tree Park"
Nancy Miehle

"I really love that this is a medium that you don't always see in a fine art setting - really well done, supper interesting use of atmopheric perspective!"

Abstract

First-place
"Lady of the Glen"
Nancy Kimes

"Stunning colors and haunting spectre of the lady. Love it."

Second-place
"Green Aurora"
Eddie Tucker

"Nice flow and composition, playful colors, reminds me of the microscope imagery and macro imagery all at once."

Third-place
"Rapid Flow"
Nancy Kimes

"I love the flow - it looks like a topographic map and a lava flow all at the same time."

Best of Show

"Red Hot Sunset"
Joan Scott

"Stunning texture and movement, beautiful color selection, nicely mysterious foreground and subtle color variouations in the sky"

Thanks go to the participating artists that shared their work with us. To Rainbow Stew and all visitors that make these shows possible. And congratulations to the creators that placed!

If you find yourself out and about, make sure to stop by Rainbow Stew (please follow any guidelines that they may require) and enjoy the Judged Fine Art show. It will be displayed until May when we transition into the open Judged Spring Photography Show!

We all want to take advantage of this great space because it sees a constant stream of traffic throughout the week. Chaparral Artists see sales through this venue, so do not pass up the opportunity to hang your art with us when you can during these shows.

Stay safe and continue creating!

Writeup! Acrylic Pouring Demonstration

beverly

The Dirty Pour Method

Date: March 9, 2020
Author: Raini Armstrong

Acrylic pouring has become so popular that you have probably seen a version of it in every member's gallery, big or small. There are almost twenty different pouring techniques, many that are similar enough they could and probably should be grouped together. I am not an expert by any means, I hope to share a bit of information, and after the demonstration offered by Beverly Schmuckle, I can impart at least a little of that information.

Beverly demonstrated the 'dirty pour' technique of the Acrylic Pouring method. With the aid of two volunteers, she was able to provide examples of three versions of the similarly grouped techniques involved in the dirty pour. A dirty pour refers to the process of pre-mixing individual colors, layering them together in a vessel, and then the pouring of these colors onto a surface. Dirty pours are considered the most common acrylic pour methods.

Many tools and techniques can be used to then vary the results of this type of pour. Beverly first demonstrated the flip-cup technique to apply paint to the canvas and then she demonstrated the string pull technique. Raini volunteered to show a pattern pour technique. Nancy volunteered to illustrate the use of a tool during the pour - a sieve that would create a design as the paint transferred through it.

Beverly shared that many available sources on the internet that demonstrate and teach Acrylic Pouring. She urged the group to visit YouTube and become more familiar with the acrylic pour method but also urged everyone to be safe when watching and following these online sources. One particular technique that Beverly does not recommend is the fire method - lighting the acrylic paint on fire during a pour - this is a highly dangerous method without proper precaution and safety gear in place. She also does not recommend using bookbinding glue during the process of any pour because the adhesive remains tacky for a long time.

Beverly creates beautiful scenes with her acrylic pours. Her interest seems to be in the search for how a pour can somehow signify a known scene or animal, with as few alterations as possible. Some artists revel in, and accentuate, the odd and morphing qualities of their pours, preferring the naturally abstract nature of the finished product. Others use the poured result purely as a backdrop to their object of interest, adding more detail paint to represent their primary focus. And then others, like Beverly, exercise their powers of imagination by studying the result of their dried pour and searching for a scene that speaks to them. She will go into her pour and add small amounts of paint to accentuate a landscape or creature, drawing the viewer's attention to the finished product.  

The demonstration given by Beverly Schmuckle was very informative. She offered a printed walk-through to help those interested in repeating the processes, and she brought in a number of examples of her own acrylic pours.

Writeup! Holiday Party

xmas19

Date: December 12, 2019
Author: Raini Armstrong

Chaparral Artists enjoyed their end of year Christmas party on December 9, 2019. There was plenty of fantastic food to share, along with a beautiful selection of desserts. There were a plethora of hidden gifts to bid on during the pig-in-the-poke portion of the afternoon. Eleven greeting cards were entered into the card competition, and several members went home with either a Christmas cactus or poinsettia.

I have attended many of the Chaparral Artists end of year parties. I enjoy each and every one of them because they provide an opportunity to spend time with other members and their friends and family. Sometimes, the end of year party offers the perfect excuse for a member to visit when their schedule doesn't typically allow for the monthly second Monday afternoon general meetings. For others, it provides a fun way to share their talents with a craftier focus - the creation of greeting cards. And let's admit it, the pig-in-the-poke event is fun for both gift-givers and bidders! I still do not know what is more fun, the process of devising a cute clue regarding the contents of a bagged or wrapped gift, or opening something you have won! There were some twenty-five gift to bid on during the party, so you can guess that there were many fun notes and hints to enjoy before the bidding began.

This year, Virginia Neal won the greeting card competition with her beautiful merging of handcrafted text and imagery. Of the eleven entries, Virginia's was certainly a favorite, but the options created quite the contest. I especially enjoyed the three different representations of poinsettia!

The 2019 Christmas party was lovely and here is to looking forward to many more!

Writeup! Molded Glass Demonstration

mould

Date: October 14, 2019
Author: Raini Armstrong

Hot Glass; this sounds ominous, but then I am far more comfortable with the 2-dimensional painting processes that don't often involve kilns!

Hot glass is pretty amazing, involving several processing steps that lean toward clay molding (in my opinion). That is until the baking comes into play because the heat required with 'baking' glass is ridiculously high.

Our October demonstrator presenting 'Hot Glass' was none other than Georgia Ryan. Georgia is a fantastic artist who has jumped into numerous art forms that appeal to her, somehow becoming a practical expert in them all. Georgia has shared her talents with Chaparral Artists in the past, presenting an art form known for calming the nerves and focusing the mind - Zentangle.

Georgia's work with glass could be considered as far from the creating patterns with the pen as one might get, but the focus and dedication are likely similar.

Georgia introduced the group to several glass art processes, including Sand Caching, Sheet Glass, Slumping, Paste of Glass, Warm Glass, and Hot Glass.

Working with glass can be complicated and extremely technical, but I was amazed at the variety of techniques used with the medium. Working with glass is fascinating, extremely adventurous, involves a great deal of experimentation, and is very time-consuming. The process Georgia went in-depth on was Hot Glass, which includes creating wax molds that can be permanent or temporary, coloring glass, packing the glass 'paste' into hand-made frames or molds, baking the glass, and cooling it. Some of Georgia's creations take countless hours to complete. She designs a pattern and begins creating a temporary or lasting form. She prepares the glass paste and begins packing it into the mold, taking 10+ hours, depending upon the details of the mold. Practically the same number of hours/days are required to cool the glass as it took to bake it. And finally, much care is taken to unpack the finished product.

Working with glass looked terrific. I do not think that I will expand my hobby list to include it, in part because of the expense of kilns, but I honestly admire Georgia Ryan for her diligence and experimentation!

Writeup! Encaustic Painting Demonstration

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Pine Sap, Bees Wax & Oils

Date: September 9, 2019
Author: Raini Armstrong

Encaustic painting, or hot wax painting, uses heated wax and colored pigments on a variety of solid canvas-like surfaces. The technique has been in use since 200AD, but it seems to have become all the rage over the last ten years.

Gretchen Grunt, a fabulous artist, educator and the owner of the 29 Palms Creative Center & Gallery in 29 Palms since 2003, provided an enlightening demonstration on the encaustic painting form during the September 2019 general meeting. This medium is ancient, using bees wax and pine sap as the carrier for pigment—in this case, oil pigments. Gretchen is clearly a fan of this interesting medium because of its versatility and workability. In fact, she raved that encaustic painting is about discovery, experimentation, carrying with it only a couple of rules—paint on a solid surface and make sure to ‘fuse’ a layer if you want to keep it in place. You are free to lay color down, create textures by dragging almost anything through the pigmented wax and roughing up the color, or simply by removing zones that didn’t quite turn out. Until heat is used to solidify the layer, the applied color is completely changeable. The resulting art piece can become as detailed as you want it to be, and the built up layers that results from the application of color reaches a three-dimensional status quickly. Best yet, if you are a person who enjoys the tactile experience, the resulting art can be touched!

The encaustic art form is versatile, long lasting and intriguingly forgiving for those artists wishing to have fun with experimentation. It is possible to purchase encaustic materials directly from art stores. If you are an avid DIYer you can you can make your own supplies from you favorite oil pigments, bees wax and pine sap, and time to mix everything together.

The demonstration was amazing. I have been hoping to know more about the art form since art stores began stocking growing selections of tools and painting mixtures. Gretchen's demo provided the perfect overview of the medium, and best yet, she shared ways to lower the cost of materials, making the art form absolutely accessible for experimenters like me!

News Brief – 2019-2020 Season Begins!

Written by Raini Armstrong

Chaparral Artists make it a habit to take the summer months of July and August off. We do not hold General Meetings or hang shows at Rainbow Stew, all in an attempt to prepare for the upcoming Fall and Winter action. But let me tell you, a simple hiatus doesn’t stop us from staying busy and crazy creative. The summer months often provide great opportunities for art creation, especially if the art in question can be accomplished indoors! For this reason, Chaparral Artists will dedicate the first show of the season to the topic “What I did this Summer”. 

Did you take a photographic excursion?
Did you paint like a fiend?
Did you brave the heat and work on three-dimensional pieces outdoors?!

We would love to hear about your adventures during the September Chaparral Meeting. It will be an exciting one; in addition to sharing our summer stories and creative adventures, we will be treated to a demonstration by Gretchen Grunt on encaustic painting! Encaustic painting, or hot wax painting, uses heated wax and colored pigments on a variety of canvas-like surfaces. The technique has been in use since 200AD, but it seems to have become all the rage over the last ten years. Gretchen's demonstration will certainly be a must see if you are already interested in the process, or are curious about what the technique entails!

Mark your calendar for these exciting opening season events! The September Chaparral Artists meeting with demonstrator Gretchen Grunt and the members only show "What I did this Summer" at Rainbow Stew:

  • Chaparral General Meeting (SEPTEMBER)  at the Center for Healthy Generations in Yucca Valley
    September 9 at 1-3pm
  • "What I did This Summer" members show at Rainbow Stew
    Intake Day 1, September 12 at 4:30-6pm
    Intake Day 2, September 13 at 12-2pm
  • Gubler's Paint-out at Gubler's Orchids in Landers
    September 14 at 10-12pm, please show up a little early and bring your own supplies for painting or photography!

Writeup! Wax Painting Demonstration

nancy

Rice Paper & Watercolor & Wax

Chaparral Artists enjoyed a demonstration by Nancy Miehle who intrigued everyone with a painting technique involving wax! The process is simple, a bit messy, and so much fun. This technique is a slightly altered form of “Watercolor batik” and it combines watercolors, rice paper, and melted wax, and the result truly creates a product that 'pops.'

Nancy was ready with all of her tools, which included several sheets of rice paper, her watercolors, used brushes, and pre-melted wax. She shared that rice paper has a rough and smooth side, and informed everyone that the smooth side should be painted on. The rice paper must be placed on a mobile painting surface - such as a small sheet of plexiglass. A scene is traced onto the rice paper with a permanent pen - in our case, an iris was provided. Nancy then spattered the rice paper with wax as well as brushed on wax to protect ANY white spots, as this application of wax will block out those locations, disallowing any watercolor to absorb into the rice paper. After the wax dried (it happens quickly) we began painting with watercolors. Vivid colors will result in a very stunning end-product, so have at it and go wild with color! The painted rice paper must be allowed to dry COMPLETELY.

Once everything is completely dry, a coating of melted wax is applied over the entire sheet of rice paper. This, too, must be allowed to dry COMPLETELY. Finally, paper towels were placed over the rice paper, and a hot iron was applied to the layers. The paper towels absorb the reheated wax, pulling it from the rice paper, leaving the watercolor imagery behind.

The finished product is a vivid watercolor, painting on rice paper, with slight elements of protective wax, which seems to deepen the inks left behind during the process of wax removal. The rice paper can be float mounted on watercolor paper and framed.

This process was fascinating to watch!

Writeup! Refractured Watercolor Demonstration

jeni

Jeni Bate wowed Chaparral Artists by demonstrating a technique she coins as Refractured Watercolor during the May 2019 General Meeting.

Jeni is a magnificent artists that works big, something that I am in awe of. She has a knack for painting loose and free with the watercolor medium, in vivid colors, to capture serene as well as dramatic scenes. She often begins by painting with watercolor on a whole sheet of watercolor paper - but where I would feel accomplished with the end result, she goes further. Jeni coins her process as Refractured Watercolor because she actually cuts her watercolors up!

This process is fantastic and completely engaging. She begins by painting a scene that speaks to her. She then dismantles it into shapes and sizes that will work toward her end goal. She numbers these pieces to keep track of them and then reassembles these watercolor pieces onto a canvas - in a different order than she had started with. Jeni then paints on the canvas, using acrylics, in a manner that ties these assembled images together. She might even add some of her poetry, poetry inspired by the location and atmosphere that inspired the painting in the first place.

Jeni's finished art piece is both a visual and written word art form!